Jeanne Reames

Jeanne Reames's picture

Professional Information

Genres
historical, SF&F, ethnic (native) literary fiction, academic non-fiction
Full Name: 
Jeanne Reames
City of Residence: 
Omaha
Biography: 

Jeanne somehow managed to acquire three different degrees in three different subjects at three different universities, but finally settled down to ancient history after being lured in by the age-old fascination of Alexander the Great.

Tenured at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, she teaches courses on ancient Greece and Macedonia, as well as the Ancient Near East and the Early Church.  She also serves as graduate program chair for history and directs the Ancient Mediterranean Studies Program.  As a part-blood Miami-Peoria Indian, she's a member of UNO's Native American Studies faculty, mostly as support personnel and living proof that one's interests aren't genetic.  She has, however, published short fiction and poetry with native themes.

Recently, she contracted with Riptide Publishers for a pair of coming-of-age novels about the young Alexander before he became "the Great."  The series is tentatively titled Dancing with the Lion: Becoming (1) and Rise (2).  The first book should be released in late 2018 or early 2019.

Her current work-in-progress is 49: a novel of Dionysos & Ariadne.  It's the first in a science fantasy series that recasts the Titanomachy, or the war between the gods (the Titans and the Olympians).  Although the war took place almost 4000 years in the past, it never really ended.  How did the god of groves, vines, and wine--plus his mortal, reincarnated wife--wind up at the center of such a truly "epic" struggle?

Besides fiction, Jeanne writes academic non-fiction and occasionally blogs.  She edited (with Tim Howe) Macedonian Legacies (Regina Pub., 2008), and has authored 14 articles and book reviews in Syllecta Classica, the Ancient History Bulletin, Ancient World, as chapters in edited collections, et al.

Outside academia and writing, Reames reads, occasionally binges on Hulu, cooks and enjoys getting her hands in the dirt (gardening). She has a son attending UNL, two impertinent black cats (Licorice and Cecilia), and a well-behaved garden bunny named Summer.

Published Works: 

Fiction/Poetry

"I Choose to Fall Later," Red Ink, no. 16.2-17.2 (2013)

"Indeterminate Creatures" in Native American Literatures: Generations, no. 2 (2010)

 

Non-fiction

"Appropriating Narratives of Empire: Alexander the Great and the Destruction of the Branchidae," submitted: Ancient History Bulletin, in process.

"Why Did Alexander the Great's Empire Collapse So Soon after His Death?" invited essay by ABC-CLIO/Praeger Publishing's "Idea Exchange" Database in Academic Solutions Database for World History: Ancient and Medieval Eras, 2013.

"Book Review: Alexander the Great, A New History," Waldemar Heckel and Lawrence A. Tritle, eds., Blackwell, 2009, in The Canadian Journal of History 45.1 (2010).

"The Cult of Hephaistion," Responses to Oliver Stone's 'Alexander,' Paul Cartledge and Fiona Greenland, eds., (Madison: Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 2010) 183-217.

"The Philoas Affair ... Again," Macedonian Legacies, Jeanne Reames and Timothy Howe, eds. Claremont, CA: Regina Books, 2009) 165-81.

"Book Review: Empire of Ashes by Nicholas Nicastro," Amphora, American Philological Association, 6.1 (2007).

"Alexander as Icon: Some Socio-Political Contexts of Alexander the Great in Twentieth-Century Fiction," Alexander's Empire: From Formulation to Decay, Waldemar Heckel and P. V. Wheatley, eds (Claremont, CA: Regina Books, 2006) 233-44.

**Published as Reames-Zimmerman:

"A History of Alexander on the Big Screen," Amphora, American Philological Association, 3.2 (2004).

"Alexander the Great," "Macedonian Ruler Cult," "Theseus," and "Astrology," Holy People of the World: an Encyclopedia, 3 vols., Phyllis Jestice, ed., 2004.

"The Mourning of Alexander the Great," Syllecta Classica 12 (2001) 98-145.

"An Atypical Affair? Alexander the Great, Hephaistion, and the Nature of Their Relationship," The Ancient History Bulletin 13.3 (1999) 81-96.

(with Eugene N. Borza) "Some New Thoughts on the Death of Alexander the Great," The Ancient World 31.1 (2000) 1-9.

Book Review. "Introducing the Bible. Volume 1: the Old Testament and Intertestamental Literature," The Review of Biblical Literature Online for the Society of Biblical Literature.

"Was Alexander the Great Gay?" Greek American Review 52.626 (Nov. 1999) 19-21.